Tag Archives: David Hockney

artqueer:

I’m in the Mood for Love
David Hockney
1961

“Hockney duly tried his hand at abstraction, but found it too barren. He was at this moment in a phase of rapid self-discovery on both artistic and personal levels, coming to terms with his own sexuality, and at the same time searching for a style. His stylistic experimentation was fuelled by discussions with R.B. Kitaj, who was a student at the Royal College over the same period. Since figure-painting seemed ‘anti-modern’ Hockney began by including words in his paintings as a way of humanizing them, but these were soon joined by figures painted in a deliberately rough and rudimentary style which owed a great deal to Jean Dubuffet. Hockney’s ebullient personality soon made him well known, even outside the Royal College, and he made his first major impact as a painter with the Young Contemporaries Exhibition of January 1961. This show marked the public emergence of a new Pop movement in Britain, with Hockney (apparently) as one of its leaders.” – Edward Lucie-Smith

artqueer:

The Cha Cha That Was Danced in the Early Hours of 24th March 1961
David Hockney
1961

artqueer:

Adhesiveness
David Hockney
1960

“Adhesiveness deals openly with homosexuality. The title is an appropriation of Walt Whitman’s term for homoerotic love. Two figures are shown in an embrace. The mutual insertion of phallic forms into each figure imbues the painting with an explicitness scarcely belied by the abstraction of the figures. Adhesiveness was unprecedented not only for its explicitness, but for the fact that it was a declaration of Hockney’s own homosexuality.” – Michael Johnson

artqueer:

Doll Boy
David Hockney
1960-1961

“Doll Boy (1960), a campy yet artful meditation-as-crush on pop singer Cliff Richard, is a perfect, early illustration of Hockney’s abiding artistic philosophy that ‘you can’t have art without play … . People tend to forget that play is serious, but I know that of course it is’” - John McFarland